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Nintendo needs to try mobile in-app purchasing according to investor

As Nintendo continue to remain relevant in the gaming industry it seems an investor has wrote a letter to Nintendo president Satoru Iwata urging him to try in-app purchasing on mobile phones. With the company not keen to entertain the mobile space an investor has given Nintendo reason to believe this could be a worthwhile way for the firm to obtain great rewards doing this.

Hedge fund manager Seth Fischer wrote to Iwata saying he believes “Nintendo can create very profitable games” that revolve around in-game revenue models. He went on to mention those spending hours playing titles like Super Mario, the Legend of Zelda and Donkey Kong as children are a demographic that are now playing on smartphones.

We understand that Nintendo is trying free-to-play with Steel Diver: Sub Wars, but their reluctance to embrace the mobile space could be detrimental to the future of the company. The full story is documented on Nintendo Life as they discuss how mobile titles with game-altering in-app purchases could be something the company really needs to look into.

Nintendo has plenty of investors and shareholders to keep happy and Iwata could be ignoring a potential goldmine as far as tablet and mobile gaming is concerned, but we are intrigued to know what our readers think of this. Would you entertain paying money to gain an advantage in a game?

Written by Marlon Votta

Marlon joined the Product Reviews team in March 2011. He brings a wide-range of experience to PR, and has studied and worked in a diverse range of industries. These include art and design, a Horticulturalist, graphics and printing. Personal interests include music, football, boxing, traveling, and different languages, although Marlon has an Italian background. He now looks to expand his computer and tech knowledge by writing news on the latest trends in this industry. Follow Marlon if you’re looking for an unbiased view of the latest products, and tech services.

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