iPad 4 vs. Nexus 10 and Apple ecosystem

By Daniel Chubb - Jan 30, 2013

It is true that a lot of people pay more for Apple not only for the better build materials but also for Apple’s ecosystem. Today we wanted to look at the iPad 4 vs. Nexus 10 in terms of specs, and also taking into account the system behind Apple that a lot of people are buying into. It is fair that over the years some people have built up a number of Apple products that work well together, and the iPad 4 would integrate nicely with your Apple TV, MacBook, iPhone, and other products that use iOS or Mac OS X.

Dedicated Apple fans say that new tablet shoppers need to look past the specs, when looking at the iPad 4 vs. Nexus 10, and to ignore hardware and display resolution. They point to the whole Apple ecosystem and App Store, which a large number of iOS users believe is ahead of the competitors, and some parents state “if you’re trying to find something for your kids, I wouldn’t recommended anything but iTunes“.

Apple iPad 4 and Google Nexus 10 features important to you – I can speak from personal experience that our son has preferred using the Apple iPad, now iPad mini, over our Nexus 7 but this doesn’t mean it is a better option for everyone. The fact is that certain functions are better for one person and then to another they will be totally irrelevant, so this is why you’ll always see one person trying to convince another that certain features are better, but they won’t always agree considering not all functions are important to another person.

What’s better for you, Apple iPad 4 or Google Nexus 10? We wanted to present the main differences between the 4th generation iPad and Nexus 10, which can be seen in the chart below that shows the differences in specs. Take a look at the difference when it comes to specs, and let us know which is better on paper in your opinion?

Apple ecosystem with iPad 4 and other iPads – It is fair to say that the 4th generation iPad has a better display than the iPad mini, which is due to the Retina display on the larger iPad, but the screen ratio has been kept the same and simplifies things for iOS app developers. The Apple ecosystem makes it easier for developers to support the iPad with dedicated apps, which is also helped by the fact that there’s a lot less variety than seen with Android tablets. The downside is that Apple seem to charge a lot more money for their products, which might be due to the fact that people are paying the money, so until that changes it seems Apple will always cost more.

Google Nexus 10 is the best of the bunch – you won’t be disappointed with your new Nexus 10 tablet, and while you’ll find a massive range of Android tablets to choose from that offer a nice choice for all budgets, this choice also causes problems when it comes to supporting these Android tablets with dedicated apps for a better experience. The Android SDK makes it easy to write apps that work on all screen sizes, but the problem is this isn’t happening right now, and instead you’ll find most Android apps are scaled up smartphone apps that lack the dedicated design for a tablet as seen with made-for-iPad apps.

Google’s developer resources certainly make it easy for devs to create dedicated Android tablet apps, but in reality there aren’t many apps built for the Nexus 10 display, or in fact most Android tablet displays. In time we hope more devs will care to make apps for Android tablets, rather than smartphone apps with the same layout.

We’ve included a couple of videos below that compare the iPad 4 and Nexus 10, so take a look and then hit the comments with your thoughts. You can also see a visual review of the Google Nexus 10 and LG Nexus 4 here, or some iPad 4 benchmarks in an article from earlier this week.

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