Key Canon EOS 7D Mark II features absent from specs

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With just over two weeks to go until the embargo for Canon’s next DSLR camera is due to end, we thought we would have a little recap of what we know about the EOS 7D Mark II so far, and there are two key features from the proposed specs missing, which could be a concern.

Even though the Canon EOS 7D Mark II specs should turn out to be the best from the entire range, we do have an issue with the lack of built-in Wi-Fi and touchscreen. Having no Wi-Fi means you will have to still take the memory card out in order to transfer images, unless there is Bluetooth.

Also See: Awaiting Canon 7D Mark II manual

This is not only time consuming to do so, but also means less practical if you have no card reader on the device you wish to transfer the images to, and so have to use a USB cable instead.

The smartphone and tablet age has meant that we now take the touchscreen for granted and many camera makers have taken advantage of this. However, Canon must feel that the use of a touchscreen on cameras such as its 7D Mark II DSLR is not required because using more traditional controls is much preferred by photographers.

As for the specs that will be part of the 7D Mark II, we have a full metal body, new sensor technology, 12FPS or possibly faster, Dual Pixel AF, and a 46-megapixel sensor. These features do vary from what we have reported before, as these are based on the latest assumptions from Canon Rumors.

Key Canon EOS 7D Mark II features absent from specs

 
  • Shanos

    I have wifi on my 6d but never use it, I tried it once to see if it works but see no real benefit, I use a large fast card (with enough capacity to see me through a weekends shooting if needed), I then transfer the files directly via sd in my macbook, or with my usb 3 to sd adaptor on other machines (these are both far quicker and more reliable imo).
    If you are shooting in a studio (I am not), then a wifi sd card can be purchased fairly cheaply that will do the job (and is also a separate item so one less thing that could possibly go wrong in a camera).
    The other thing with wifi in the camera is battery consumption, obviously switching on will reduce battery life.

    As for touch screens, whilst they may have there uses (have played with a few dos bodies that feature them) I think I cope ok with a standard screen (again one less thing to worry about going wrong).

    The things that (if true) are going to make this camera are the high frame rate, my 6D does sound a little slow next to my (now water damaged but thats another story) 1d MK II or my partners 7D.
    If the auto focus is able to keep up with the frame rate and we don’t end up with 2 out of 12 shots that are in focus, it would be awesome.
    The high mega pixel count will be great as long as the new technology is able to stop light cross talk over the adjacent pictures, hopefully it will give as good or better low light/high ISO quality than my 6D
    (which is imo great).

    I am following this with great interest as if the build quality and specs are correct, it could possibly be a great alternative in the field to a 1d mk IV (crop).

  • Adam Sanford

    Lacking wifi matters for smaller shoots, but if this is the ‘crop 1DX’ sports/wildlife camera we hope it to be, people racking up a thousand shots at a sporting event would need to pull their cards anyway.

    Of course, that’s a big if. There is tremendous split with the rumor mongers on whether this is a nerfed $1,500 body which is little more than a current 7D with a new sensor, or if it will have the apocalypse-proof build, 1DX/5D3 AF system and super high FPS rig people might pay $2,500 for. It remains to be seen if Canon *must* hit the $1,300-1,700 price point for business/portfolio reasons or if they are going to offer a legitimate top-end birding/wildlife/sports rig and start charging people for some of the money they wouldn’t have to spend on superteles due to the added reach. We shall see.

  • Jeffrey Fortuna

    No touchscreen is a big plus for water housing users, underwater housings use strong spring buttons to press physical buttons while under the water. I’d also argue that the small size of the LCD makes touch gestures less helpful than todays larger screen phones, if they really wanted to keep up with smartphones they’d add voice guided menus like Google Now and Siri :)

  • archer

    Agree, I would consider a touch screen to be a strike against it, not for it.