2016 Chevy Volt vs. Tesla Model 3 for range

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LG Chem has developed new lithium-ion batteries that will be good enough to offer an EV a range of 200 miles, and while it is unlikely that Tesla will make use of this latest technology, there is a good chance that General Motors will. There are now rumors to suggest that the 2016 Chevy Volt could have a 200 miles plus range.

Let’s get one thing straight, LG Chem has yet to announce which automaker will be using the new batteries, but since they have worked with GM and Chevrolet before, and the fact that General Motors has claimed to have been working on an EV that is capable of going 200 miles on a single charge, it is easy to see why such an assumption has been made.

2016 Chevy Volt vs. Tesla Model 3 – If this is the case, then it is clear to see that GM is looking ahead to take on the Tesla Model 3 in late 2016 or early 2017. All versions of the Model S currently offer a range of more than 200 miles, and so it stands to reason that its next model will also.

Seeing as though the Model 3 range will be over 200 miles, then the next generation Chevy Volt has to as well, which is also another reason why a deal with LG Chem is highly likely.

This could be pivotal for GM because the all-new Chevy Volt is expected to cost about $30,000, whereas the Model 3 could cost around $35,000 – $40,000. We guess it will all come down to features and mileage, so which of the two do you think will win the EV showdown?

Also See: Chevy Colorado, GMC Canyon 2015 mpg for frugal option

2016 Chevrolet Volt vs. Tesla Model 3 for range

 
  • CMCNestT .

    1) Volt is a plug-in hybrid vehicle and will remain so for Volt 2.0. Reports say that it will have a 1.0 liter 3 cylinder engine. It will get 40-60 miles of electric range then use the gasoline engine to produce electricity.

    2) LG is developing the batteries not developed. LG “feels” it can get the 200 mile battery to a price point where an auto manufacture can use it in a $30k-$35k vehicle by 2017. It remains to be seen whether an auto manufacture believes that price and scale of production is sufficient to make a $30-$35k electric vehicle profitably.

    • danwat1234

      40-60? That is a good guess.

      • Allen Williams

        My 2014 already goes 40. People willing to suffer in theirs (not me) that turn off the AC and drive like grandpas can get 50-60.

        • disqus_lSZTklmvO1

          Been averaging 48-50 all summer in my 2012 with moderate driving and AC. Even a small bump in the batt range could see average real-world results over 60 and hypermile records at or near 100 miles. I’m kinda stoked to see that happen.

  • Kirk Hilles

    I doubt the Volt will EVER reach triple digit miles.

    • danwat1234

      If the Volt is still being produced in 20 years it probably will

      • Kirk Hilles

        Yes, but part of my assumption is that once electric cars become commonplace, they’ll want to get rid of such a silly name “Volt”. By that point, I would agree, though that they’ll probably have a number of vehicles with that range.

      • John VanBrunt

        Chevy got crucified by the moral public when documentary exsposed evil oil interest monopolising car companies, after the public out cry,-who killed the elecric car- they have courageously become the world leader……when car company suffered karma in the world car leaders bankrupt…they have wisened up when there oil partners told them to go to hell!!!now its there time to tell the oil companies to go to hell!!!karma is Gods will…….mother earth has blessed me in so many ways since i drive clean…..mostly my wallet rockefellers!!!!

    • John VanBrunt

      Kirk …..i have over 60.000 miles on my Chevy Volt…never had any issues, and the word is electric drive motors can out last engine burnt motors four to one. im looking forward to get a million miles on my volt……it pays for itself ten fold.

    • Allen Williams

      Many already have.

  • Beer guy

    Lol… Do any of you even own a Volt?

    • Allen Williams

      I do and it kicks ass. 6 months or more to a tank of gas. It gives you a little kick in the ass when you floor it. Fun to drive. Futuristic and comfortable.

      • jonasg

        Volt sucks. Cheap styling, kind of boring and it does not stand out. same 100 year old combustion architecture with over 1,000 more moving parts than a Tesla. Battery half density than a Tesla.

        • Allen Williams

          Who cares if its not as good as a car that’s 10x the price? I still say its better. It goes where I need on electric 90% of the time and it goes on gas for the rest. Try taking a Tesla 300+ miles out. You can’t do it. My volt will though. Its also the only car that delivers full EV performance even when running on gas. I love my car and I love going 6 months without wasting time at the pump or worrying about getting stranded like a tesla.

        • jonasg

          Yes a Tesla can increasingly being takenover 300 miles thanks to innovative siperchargers powepowered partially buy sunlight. What has done GM to bring such innovation? Nothing.

        • bobbleheadguru

          Chevy Volt is a great car that can do everything a Telsa can do in terms of commuting (for the majority of commuters) at 1/3 the effective price.

          Its reliability record and satisfaction are tops in the industry for cars under $50K.

          Its effective price is $5000K less than the average car (under $27,000). It is a car that an average car buyer can afford.

          Conversely, I could buy a Chevy Volt AND a Chevy Corvette for the price of a mid-level Telsa.

          They are two different market segments. A BMW 7 series is “better” than a Toyota Camry. But the Camry is a realistic car for the majority of new car buyers. The BMW is not. Similarly, the Telsa and Volt are not direct competitors.

        • jonasg

          You said it. One could buy two or three Kias instead of buying a 335i. But that doesnt stop people from happily buying a BMW.

          Listen , the architecture of the Volt is nothing new. That is the part you dont get it. I wont be surprised if GM doesnt go brankrupt for good in few years. Volt was a fiasco and sales are low.

        • bobbleheadguru

          The architecture of the Volt is COMPLETELY NEW. EREV is a completely new innovative way to have the best of both worlds.

          They are different cars. You can a have a Chevy Volt and a reasonable mortgage… or you can put your entire mortgage payment into a Telsa.

        • jonasg

          Oh you are the reason GM and its type are not dead as it deserves. If you really cared for cost efficiency you should buy a Jetta TDI, have similar driving and (lack of) style experience and save even more money for your mortgage.

          News of LG trying a cost efficient 200+ miles battery for GM is just vaporware for now.

          I will not give one penny to GM or other lazy auto makers, let alone those arrogant auto dealers. So far I have seen one company which shows it derserves support. My money goes to Tesla.

        • bobbleheadguru

          You can call the Volt a lot of things.. but “lazy” is not one of them. If GM is so lazy, why did they get to the market quick enough outsell Telsa 2011-2013 AND incorporate Volt technology into 100,000+ cars/year (eAssist)? [Cue Cricket sounds here...]

          Outside of that I will not argue with people who insist the world is flat.

        • jonasg

          Outsell Tesla using a cheap car is not a valid comparison. It is the same you say Impalas sell more than Lamborghinis. Potatos are oranges.

  • paulo

    Volt

  • bobbleheadguru

    The Volt is different market segment from the Tesla. Volt can go 1000 miles in one day with regular 6 minute gasoline fill ups… It can also handle the daily commute without using a drop of gas. That is very different than the Tesla’s value proposition.

    • jonasg

      So it does a Kia and all the rest of combustion engine cars. The Volt is a just a public relations stunt to keep auto dealers employed servicing combustion engines. Ridiculuous car. Proof is that look at all awards, market capitalization and reputation Tesla has earned with people who have good taste.

      • bobbleheadguru

        1. The average commute in the US is LESS THAN the Volt’s electric only range. That means for the majority of car buyers, the Volt can be used for commuting without using a drop of gas AND it can his used for longer trips without any range anxiety. The net result is that the average Chevy Volt driver gets about 125MPG… which is close enough to “infinity” MPG (of an electric car) that from a practical sense it does not matter (perhaps the cost of one fancy Starbucks drink every 2 weeks).

        2. “A Kia” cannot handle a daily commute without using a drop of gas.

        3. Chevy Volt has outsold ALL Plug-ins in the US including media and market Capitalization darling Telsa 2011-2013. It has has held the #1 Customer Satisfaction position for ALL cars under $50K in 2011, 2012 and 2013 (Consumer Reports).

        4. Chevy Volt derivative technology has already been incorporated in large, high volume, high profit Chevys and Buicks, boosting overall GM MPG in about $5,000,000,000 worth of cars per year. That is a full order of magnitude bigger than than the Tesla.

        Sorry, none of the facts support your talking points.

        • jonasg

          Oh God. Just explain this fact: electric car sales have been very slow(except for Tesla which is in the luxury category). The main reason people cite is the limited range. Most people need more than 200 miles to feel compelled to buy it.

          Hybrid cars like the Volt, I repeat, keep the same maintenance plagues of combustion engine.

        • bobbleheadguru

          Chevy Volt’s range is 375 miles. You can fill it up in 6 minutes at any of over 250K gas stations.

          Range anxiety is a non-Issue for Chevy Volt drivers.

          However, most of the time Chevy Volt don’t use gas. It is the best of both worlds.

          As for “maintenance”, I have spent a total of $25 on maintenance in 45,000 miles of driving. That rounds to ZERO in my book.

        • David Gilmore

          Clearly, you’re not a Volt owner. You’re a naysayer. Let me say to you, naysayer, that I have owned a Volt since 2011 and the maintenance costs thus far have been $0. Geez. I bet you’re one of those that thought personal computers were a stupid idea in the 80s.

        • disqus_lSZTklmvO1

          Over my first 24,000 miles, paid maintenance costs have averaged about $1.85 per month… sweet Jebus I’m dying here… lulz

      • disqus_lSZTklmvO1

        PR stunt? *shakes head*
        It may not be the end-all-be-all, but for the people who drive it, it’s usually the best answer for their transportation needs. I picked one up a year ago, and in one fell swoop, got a bigger, smoother, newer, more comfortable ride than my previous car, eliminated 90% of my gas usage, and still reduced my monthly transportation expenses. I do my daily driving on the battery and every month I burn a whole 7 gallons of gas doing my duty with the Air National Guard 200 miles away.
        Until the US rolls out enough public EVSE to make affordable BEVs viable outside core urban areas, this car is a godsend for the market niche it fills.
        My Volt is over two years old and just had its first oil change. Maintenance scam? Think your claims through, guy… :)

  • David Gilmore

    GM may compete with Tesla in the pure EV segment with this battery advance, but it won’t be in the form of a plug-in serial hybrid. So, don’t think Volt when you think 200 mile EV range. Think some other product that we haven’t seen yet. The Volt already has a 340 mile range–300 of which would be using the ICE generator. The ICE is there for when you want to go on a road trip without compromises. The only draw back I’ve experienced thus far in those “road trip” situations is the need to fill up frequently. It only holds 9 gallons yielding approximately 300 miles per fill up. Between road trips, I use zero gallons. Unfortunately, this concept is nearly impossible for the general public to understand. I have yet to figure out why, but if I think back to my public school days, I do recall many fellow students being unable to add two numbers together. I guess they all grew up to be the folks who don’t get it.

    • bobbleheadguru

      Excellent points.

      When people ask me about my Volt, here is what I tell them:

      1. 375 mile total range.
      2. 273ft-lbs of instant torque (more than a BMW 3-Series gear driven torque).
      3. 210MPG with my FIFTY MILE roundtrip commute.
      4. $316/month payment – $175/month in fuel savings (even including electricity costs) = $141/effective cost.
      5. Almost no maintenance costs (oil change every 20,000 miles, regular tire rotation).

      My insurance for my family is higher on a per month basis than my Chevy Volt effective monthly cost.

  • Naturenut99

    re: “Seeing as though the Model 3 range will be over 200 miles, then the next generation Chevy Volt has to as well…” No, it doesn’t. Because the Model 3 is only EV. The Volt has a range extender. That’s the point of a range extender, you can have a smaller battery that covers local/daily driving , but you won’t be stranded if you need to go farther.

    • Naturenut99

      They do however need to get it up around 50+ EV miles. Preferably, 50 EV miles in winter.

  • Reggie Testy

    we have the technology, capability, and bright people to make a better system that combines both gas and electric. Basically, in EV mode, the battery will be good for, 200 miles? When the battery is about to run out of electric, the gas engine kicks in. When the gas engine kicks in, the gas engine will rotate the shaft to the generator to charge up and top up the battery while in in gas mode. Thus, extending the MPG for extended travel.