Thief PS4 Vs Xbox One graphics

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Thief has just been released on Xbox One and PS4 consoles. The game has already gone on to receive favorable reviews from critics, but it appears that once again fans are more interested about the graphics comparison between the two versions.

As we told you in a previous report, Thief is another game on Xbox One that will not output at full 1080p HD resolution. The PS4 meanwhile does support this resolution, so naturally gamers are interested to see if there really is a big difference due to this discrepancy or not.

Thankfully, we are pleased to see that Thief Xbox One Vs PS4 graphics comparisons are already live on YouTube. We bring you two videos to watch now, including one from the technical specialists over at Digital Foundry which we know a lot of you wait to see with each game release.

When we told you that Thief only runs at 900p on Xbox One, Square-Enix said at the time that you would need ‘really good eyes’ to see the differences between both builds.

Environment shot between the two platforms.

Environment shot between the two platforms.

This has been justified in the gameplay comparisons, as to be honest there is not a great difference between the two, other than the usual contrast effects that we see on Xbox One versions.

We challenge you to pick out some distinct differences between the two and let us know what you think below. In our opinion though, we think you should just go out and enjoy Thief without thinking of the graphical differences and without the idea of ‘which version is better’.

Are you happy with Thief right now, PS4 or Xbox One?

Also See: Thief climbs to UK games summit

thief-ps4-vs-xbox-one-graphics

  • brian griffan

    Nothing much between them if I have to be honest xbox one is slightly smoother gameplay and cutseens

  • dr. willard peter johnson

    watching on the video with framerate comparison

    if you pause right after you are supposed to follow erin the xbox one version has more detail

    • dr. william talliwacker

      if you dont see it look at the buildings in the backround after seeing that video i think the graphics comparison video might be flawed

      • d0x360

        Its not flawed. The Xbox one version uses 16x anisotropic filtering and for some odd reason ps3 uses trilinear. This leads to the Xbox one version having better looking textures in objects a couple feet from the character and beyond.

  • WoodsForTheTrees

    What I do not get is that if people cannot see the difference in res, why the hell are we moving to 4k screens?? I understand that the human eye is only capable of seeing a certain level of detail, and if the max is 900p, why go 4k?
    Having said that, I have seen 4k tvs and they look brilliant. This seems to mean that people who suggest that 900p is the same as 1080p are probably on the end of M$ cheques or threats.
    Was going to pick this up on the PS4, but after Square Enix have basically said that it will a last gen quality (XBone quality) I will have to skip it. If there is no difference between 1080 and 900 (180) then the difference between 900 and 720 (180) is not that detectable either. And 720 is last gen. Will pick it up when it hits $20 or less. Apart from Dark Souls II, I am not paying full price for last gen games anymore. I still can’t believe SE would try to appease M$ by taking their side in the whole “resolution means nothing” debate. If graphical power did not matter to us at all, why would we have purchased new consoles with less features??? I wonder if Sleeping Dogs 2 will be gimped so that “nothing looks better than the XBone version.”

    • d0x360

      900p and 1080p are very very close in terms of resolution for a game which is why you are hard pressed to see a difference. I have a 65inch Samsung LCD and I switched input between my Xbox and ps4. I own it on Xbox and my friend let me borrow his ps4 copy for a few hours for curiosity sake. The only difference I could make out was gamma levels which could be fixed with TV settings.

      The larger the TV the easier differences are to spot but unless your TV is massive 900p and 1080p look basically the same. That said on my tv I can see a very clear difference between 720p and 1080p.

      We are moving to 4k because (provided your TV is at least 60inches) you will see a better picture over 1080p from about 4 feet away. As it stands now 1080p is no slouch so there is no huge reason to upgrade. You can get a very clean image from native 1080p. Consoles we have now can’t do 4k in a game unless that game is fairly easy on the rendering budget but the next round will do 4k which is probably when you will really see those TVs start to take off.

      The big problem with 4k is content. A movie at 4k resolution uses alot of bandwidth. New codecs should fix that issue but unless you have a solid connection with no caps you won’t be streaming tons of 4k video like we do now anytime soon.

  • Graeme Willy

    1600×900 vs.1920×1080 is a difference of 500 lines of resolution…while this may be negligible in terms of preserving color, contrast, detail…aliasing rears its Very, ugly head in sheer ferocity, in any up-scaled resolution. You notice this tremendously during the opening scene of the game, but because the rest of the game is close quarters, you don’t see/ notice it at all, going forward.
    Keep in mind, that “1080,” only referencing the height of the picture. To keep the game in aspect ratio, the 16:9 equivalent will have to be 1600×900…but here’s the real bummer, in the game industry; because we’re so blinded by marketing term “1080p,” developers and publishers can technically say the game is running 1080p, 720p, 900p and be completely within bounds…meanwhile, what you don’t know, is that the game may actually be running 1600x1080p, or 1152x720p or 1024x720p (I believe Crysis 2 on the PS3 was this). That’s a significant impact in resolution. So, the question here is, what aren’t we being told? Are all of these “next-gen” games running True 720p? (1280×720?), and True 1920×1080? True 1600×900? E.g. A True 16:9 picture?