Samsung ATIV Q review and Android to Windows 8 switching

By Posted 18 Jul 2013, 08:36

When the Samsung ATIV Q was unveiled to the world we did not know if it was a convertible tablet or an Ultrabook, but one thing we do know, we were amazed at the device for various reasons. One of things that took people by surprise was how you could switch from Android to Windows 8, or switching, as it is commonly known.

As a way to get to know the new device a little better, we thought a Samsung ATIV Q review was in order, and so we have included one of the most recent review videos for you to study. The review is a very comprehensive one and goes over all the main Samsung ATIV Q specs that are of importance, along with thoughts on the overall design.

It’s not long into the review that we get to see its party piece, and that’s the hinge, which is what helps to transform it from a tablet to a hybrid device. However, the reviewer is a little weary of this feature, and believes that it has bad news written all over it, and he could be right.

One problem that we have is when it is in tablet mode, as it looks rather comical when you hold it, as it’s a bit on the large side, and from a distance people will not know that it doubles as am Ultrabook. You need to watch all of the video, and only then can you get a greater understanding of Samsung’s new device.

Having said that, we thought you might want a demonstration of the Samsung ATIV Q Android to Windows 8 switching, which is done by selecting the dual-OS tile on the desktop. It’s rather simple to do and can be seen in action in our second video, which you will see below.

Samsung ATIV Q conclusion – Samsung does seem as though they have raised the bar for portable computer makers thanks to its four form-factors and a future proof display, but will it be on your list of things to have?

Samsung ATIV Q review and Android to Windows 8 switching

  • ThatsHowISeeIt

    Too bad this is crippled by only shipping with 4GB of RAM. When Android dual OS capability takes away 1-1.5 GB of the limited RAM available, you are barely left with 2.5-3 GB of RAM to run Windows and get your work done. That’s very little RAM for really using that 3200X1800 display for multitasking.