Chromebook Pixel battery life improvement thanks to GCM

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The Chromebook is far different to standard laptops, because they tackle things in a different way, as they are more about running software from the cloud rather than on physical storage. This has its advantages and disadvantages, but in most cases the battery life of these devices is better than on a standard laptop, although there is a performance trade-off.

However, the Chromebook Pixel went in a different direction, because not only is there a much improved display, the specs have been bumped up to try to compete with the MacBook Pro, although this has come at a price. The battery life for the Pixel is said to be around 5 hours of continuous use, compared to 7 for the Pro.

You may wonder why we are discussing this again, well it seems as though we could see a Chromebook Pixel battery life improvement thanks to Google Cloud Messaging for Chrome (GCM), and should make a showing at Google I/O. This is effectively push alert support for Chrome OS apps.

How this manages to save battery life on the Chromebook Pixel and other Chromebook devices is to receive less push notifications. This may not sound like a big deal, but we have seen how much battery life these consume when using the iPhone and Android handsets.

Not only will this help to save battery life, but less notifications also means using less data, so you only run them as and when you need them. It is a shame because current battery technology is preventing us from using all the features of our current devices, which kind of defeats the object, wouldn’t you agree?

Speaking of Google I/O, we also expect to see a revised Nexus 4 and the Nexus 7 sequel.

Thanks to the Chromium Blog.

Also See: New Toshiba Chromebook 2 hard shell cases

Chromebook Pixel battery life improvement thanks to GCM

  • overcoil

    I’m not seeing anywhere near 5 hours on my Pixel… Closer to 3. I do recognize that part of this is because a Chromebook tends to be hard on the network (wifi) since that’s where everything for it lives. I use Chrome Remote Desktop to work on some of my Windows box but that’s still hard on the battery. Netflix/YouTube is similarly hard on the battery since you’re doing two power-intensive operations (wifi & video decoding).