2012 MacBook Pro with Retina display all but confirmed

By Posted 11 May 2012, 15:28

The Retina term might not be favored by everyone, especially those in the Android camp, although when this display improvement came to the iPhone and later with the iPad 3 it changed visual quality dramatically and we’ve experienced this first hand on both devices. It has long been expected that Apple will bring this technology to their desktop and laptop computers, which has now been all but confirmed for the 2012 MacBook Pro thanks to an increasing amount of hints towards Retina inclusion.

Bringing Apple’s Retina display to the 2012 MacBook Pro – the screen is obviously the thing you look at the most on our MacBook’s and other display devices, and after spending many hours with both the Retina display on iPad 3 and the latest iPhone it’s an improvement in everyway from previous generations. The latest OS X 10.7.4 update released this week and followed with some developers/tech blogs noticing a doubling in icon resolution for TextEdit, which had taken a jump to 1024×1024 pixels. This was just one of a few built-in apps that saw an increase in file size, but the others did not see an increase in icon resolution, although a few devs believe this is a solid sign pointing to new Apple MacBook Pros and iMacs with a Retina display.

This isn’t the first time we’ve heard about icons jumping to 1024×1024 pixels, and the same has been seen for developer previews of OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion. If reports from this year and last year are correct then we could see the 15-inch 2012 MacBook Pro double its resolution, which would take the new MacBooks to 2880×1800 pixels.

Last month we also heard from Intel about the new Ivy Bridge processer, which are designed with the Retina display in-mind. This is further confirmation that the future Macs will launch with Retina displays, and now we are just waiting for Apple to confirm these rumors, although they couldn’t get more solid.

Would a new MacBook Pro with SSD and Retina display be a day one purchase for you? You also might want to read about common sense with the new Apple MacBook Pro, and features that shouldn’t be included like two hard drives.

  • SayNoToSSD

    I’m all for the Retina display, I’m all for ditching the optical drive, but if it comes out with only an SSD then I’ll be giving it a miss. Given a 512gb SSD retails for around £500, I can see it being a maximum offering of 256gb…just not enough if the rumoured specs are to be believed. 

    An improved processor, better graphics, improved OS, greater battery life, thinner & lighter design (possibly), increased resolution…all great features which would be completely undone by limiting the on board hard drive to 256gb. Yes you can get external drives, but do I really want to be lugging around even more tech than I already have to. Why buy a weight saving laptop only to throw another HDD in your bag? 

    Bang goes storing my music collection, bang goes storing my photo library, and bang goes the chance of being able to import and edit any HD video. Obviously this is all if’s, but’s and maybe’s, but unless Apple offer the ability to switch out the SSD for a 750 to 1TB HDD then I’ll be passing on this one. 
     

    • aftermarketoptions

       But that’s why you order it with the minimum spec required to get retina, then add aftermarket RAM and SSD or spinning disk.  Ideally it will have in internal slot of some kind for SSD + 2.5″ drive bay for non-SSD options – maybe 7mm ones only.

      • Mapekz

        This. When buying a laptop from HP, Dell, or what have you you should always get the cheapest RAM/HDD options since you can upgrade those yourself for greater cost efficiency (and with higher quality parts) with aftermarket parts, like Corsair RAM (instead of the generic stuff they give you).

        While Apple provides higher quality products, they are no different in this respect; you will want to install your own components for maximum gain and more affordable price.

        • SayNoToSSD

          I agree with both points, I installed aftermarket RAM in my current Mac, but opted for the HDD increase via Apple direct. My point being, why should a buyer have to pay a premium for an SSD at time of purchase (be it the cheapest spec possible or not, you’ll still be paying over the odds for that amount of storage). Why couldn’t Apple offer the buyer the choice of HDD or SSD and let them make a decision for themselves, it’s not outside the realms of possibility that someone who doesn’t wear a ‘Genius’ shirt to work, knows what they want from a laptop! 

          I can’t see any reason why they couldn’t offer a cheaper HDD option and let the SSD lovers pay the premium…and yes, then I would whip out the cheaper HDD and replace it with the biggest capacity aftermarket one that’ll fit…I wouldn’t do that having just paid a premium for an SSD. 

  • http://twitter.com/alttext Ben Edwards

    @ SayNoToSSD  Move to the cloud. Media stored locally is dead. (that said I really think it should have at least 500GB SSD)

    • SayNoToSSD

      Fantastic idea, but how do I get the content when for any unavoidable reason I’ve got no internet connection? The UK is way behind the US in terms of freely available wi-fi connections, of decent speed anyway. So that’s a non-option. Not an issue from home, but being at the mercy of a destination’s wi-fi connection for me is not a direction I’m interested in going in…yet. 

    • Guest

       that’s an odd position on the fence

  • Wolfgang Loss-Wells

    A Macbook Pro 15″ with a Retina Display, and a decent sized SSD (more than 256gigs) or alternatively, an ssd + HD combo would be a no brainer day 1 purchase for me.