Overcharging gadgets becoming a financial epidemic in UK?

By Posted 4 Jan 2012, 12:37

Almost everyone I know owns at least one gadget of some kind whether it is a mobile phone or a laptop, all of which need some form of recharging at some point. Today we have news that may come as a shock to some people as it appears millions of pounds each year is being wasted on overcharging these gadgets in the UK alone.

According to a study that was carried out, a £60 increase is added to the annual bill of the average household when the battery for a gadget becomes full and is left on charge. This happens 9 out of 10 times according to the report, with 1 in 10 admitting to being too lazy to unplug the gadgets despite potential damage to the device as well as the extra costs. This is leading to a total of £134 million being wasted each year by Britons.

Owners of Apple iPods account for 10% of the devices that are mostly overcharged, with mobile phones making up 41% and laptops leading the pack that are left on charge, accounting for 43%. Other devices that tend to be left plugged in after they are fully charged are cordless home phones, hand-held vacuum cleaners and electric toothbrushes.

According to ITProPortal the Gadget Show’s Pollyanna Woodward said ‘overcharging a gadget can often do more harm than good.’ She was also astonished to hear that ‘90% of people overcharge their gadgets.’ The report also revealed that 1 in 5 children leave toys plugged in on charge and 18 to 24 year olds are the more likely culprits of leaving their gadgets on charge than other age groups, although it is these age groups that are more likely to own devices like these anyway.

Are you one of the people that are guilty of overcharging gadgets? Do you think this could lead to a financial epidemic?

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  • Rsr

    So how long should items be charged??

  • Duh

    I’d always assumed modern chargers, especially from a smart maker like Apple, were smart enough to stop drawing power after the device was fully charged. Is that really such a technological challenge?

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