Google+ traffic falls away, novelty worn off?

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Towards the end of last month Google+ was opened up to the public, and the social networking site within a few days saw a big spike in the amount of visitors and users. Now though we have news that Google+ traffic falls away, so does that mean the novelty of the new site has worn off?

Traffic to the site has reportedly dropped by a massive sixty percent since the public launch during September. Figures have gone back down to the amount of traffic the site was getting before it was opened up, and it seems like the site is having trouble getting visitors coming back for more. Digital Trends are reporting that the latest traffic figures come courtesy of data analytics firm Chitika.

For the first couple of days of being available to the public visitors to the site leapt massively, but this is allegedly to have quickly gone back the other way. Google have had no trouble getting people to the site, but keeping there has been a different matter. Chitika feels this is because it doesn’t offer anything that Facebook doesn’t.

Because many people are already on Facebook people stick to what they already know. Google has been able to offer users popular Facebook games such as CityVille, but this doesn’t seem to be working either. It is claimed that Facebook users only spend around ten percent of their time actually playing games, so games may not be a great pull to the site.

Some of the surge in visitor numbers to Google+ may have come because of all the changes that were going on at the time with Facebook. It’s only early days and Google+ is a worthy alternative to Facebook, but if user’s friends stick with Facebook it will be difficult persuading people to switch.

Are you still using Google+?

Also See: Google Plus 500 Error, as tweets report down

  • Anonymous

    Not using Google+ anymore. It’s boring talking to random people.

  • Brian

    Don’t use facebook or google+.

    Might use google+ if the circles also interfaced with the gmail contact list as groups.