Find out how safe a new car is with the new NHTSA brochure

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Here on product reviews we always like to keep you informed about car safety, whether it’s a recall or a list of the safest cars available to purchase. One of the big features potential customers look for when buying a new vehicle is how safe it is in the event of an accident. Today we can tell you about finding out how safe a new car is with the new NHTSA brochure.

Modern cars are the safest they have ever been barring any manufacturing defects, but consumers can be met with many choices when deciding which car is the safest. Now according to an article on ConsumerReports.org, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has released a brochure which you can see here.

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The NHTSA began a new tougher five star ratings system late last year for the new 2011 model year, to rate the crash worthiness of new cars. The brochure has all the cars rated this year with all the information about the availability of the latest safety systems and features.

The crash system for this model year has a more in depth look at three areas of the vehicle. These include front and side impact protection, as well as rollover resistance. On top of this each model gets an overall score that combines all the results of the three tests, as well as comparing them to the injury risk in other cars.

You will also find information on the actual tests, and how the safety features in the cars work. There is a list of which cars have the features as standard equipment as well. A timeline shows when the NHTSA began testing cars all the way through the present day. Back in 1978 the organization began testing vehicles for frontal impact protection, and first used the five star rating system in 1996.

There is even information on the crash test dummies and how all the information is collected from them. Information in what size of dummy is used for certain crash tests is also provided, with the frontal crash having an average sized male driver with a small sized female in the front. Have a look at the brochure yourself to see if the car you may be thinking of getting fared.