Chevy Volt Sales Outperforming GM’s Expectation

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When it comes to electric vehicles, the industry is just getting started with some of the first produced EVs starting to battle it out for the highest sales in the market. One of these cars is the Chevrolet Volt.

Chevy Volt sales have started outperforming GM’s expectations and even started competing with the sales of one of the most successful selling EVs so far the Toyota Prius. Two years ago however the Volt’s success was a different story as it almost didn’t take off at all.

According to the article over at the gas 2.0 site the manufacturers narrowly avoided bankruptcy and were able to turn their situation around. Thanks to the turnaround owners of the Volt are giving sparkling reviews and 90% of them are first timers to the company.

More information about the success rate of the Chevy Volt sales can be found by clicking the link above, where you will also find details about new owners trading in their Prius for the Volt.

What do you think of this news? Does the Chevy Volt interest you? Let us know in the comment s below.

Also See: 2016 Chevy Volt range, one of many changes

  • Guest

    I bought my well equipped luxury Volt ($32k with the tax credit) only after considering other fully equipped cars in the $35k price range. The fun, quiet ride, innovative engineering, top-end features, and the fact that OPEC hates this car, where all factors. The Volt's not perfect, it needs a rear window wiper and a lower price. But both will happen over time, after all, this is the first of its kind, like version 1.1 of the Apple iPhone.

    Buying a new car. I considered gas-free driving as a desirable feature, just like a great sound system, 8 airbags, parking assist, heated seats, 2 LCD displays, OnStar, and the like (all part of the Volt I bought). Also, the value of reducing dependance of foreign oil from a national security perspective was important to me.

    80% of US drivers drive 40 miles or less per day on average (US DOT), perfect for the Volt. Driving the Volt 40 miles costs only $1.50 in electricity. Plus, the Volt can travel cross country like any other car at 37MPG with a total range of 380 miles or so. An oil change every two years. A check of the belts at 10 years. No brake pad replacement due to regen braking, all save money.

    Safety is another reason I chose the Volt. The insurance industry gave it Top Safety Pick (its highest rating) for front, side, rear and rollover. The Volt has 8 airbags, special high strength steel body, body weight of a full-sized car, electronic stability control, ABS brakes. Due to its weight, it performs like a full sized car in safety tests.

    The batteries are warranted for 8 years/100k miles. When their power density eventually fades and need replacing with newer, better, cheaper batteries, the old battery pack will be bought by power companies who will use them to store off-peak power. Eventually they will be recycled into new batteries.

    If you like the feel of muscle car power, the Volt's motor generates a healthy 273 pound-feet of torque, more than some big V6 engines. Gasoline engines don't produce their maximum torque until they hit several thousand rpm. Electric motors hit max torque immediately.

    We can either let the Japanese or Chinese or Europeans become the world leader in electric cars, or support Detroit, American innovation, jobs, and US manufacturing. But at the end of the day, this is just a car, although a very fun car!

  • Gee

    I love the idea of driving without burning fossil fuels. I have a whole brood of children, though, and will need to wait until they come out with an electric minivan. That said, I would totally by this car if I didn't need the extra space.