Spotify Free – New Limits for Users: Buy Premium or Find Alternative

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We have some important news for those of you who regularly use the popular music streaming service Spotify, as the makers have just rolled out a few major changes to the PC version of the software, and it’s changes which may upset a few of you enjoying the free version of the device.

As our US readers will know too well, Spotify is still a Europe-only application, despite continued promises that a US release and releases in other countries are coming soon.

Also See: Spotify code before Canada launch date

However, a recent update by the Spotify team has now introduced a wave of restrictions to those using the free version. For example, you’ll now only be able to listen to an individual song five times, and you’ll be restricted to just listening to just 10 hours per month – the equivalant of around 200 tracks or 20 albums.

It’s important to note that these changes are based on when you first created your Spotify account. The changes will be coming into affect from May 1st 2011, but a date of November 2010 has also been mentioned specifically – find out more about this on the official Spotify blog here, as reported from Engadget.

Unsurprisingly, these changes are for the free version only, so it’s clearly a ploy to get more users to sign up to Spotify premium which costs £9.99 a month for UK users and a similar fee to everyone else in Europe. Fans of Spotify are voicing their displeasure on the changes over on the Spotify Blog, but let us know your thoughts on it here.

Will you now buy Spotify Premium or will you say goodbye to Spotify in favor of an alternative service, such as Grooveshark for example.

  • Lacey

    It's ridiculous, There is a reason people go on free as they don't have the money to pay for all the fancy stuff! Also, are you able to listen to an individual song five times once a month or literally 5 times and then it becomes unavailable? if someone can get back to me it would be much appreciated,

    • Alan Ng

      Afraid to say Lacey..but it looks like just five times and that's it! Not five times a month…we'll let you know once it gets cleared up though.

  • dan

    well this sucks ive been using spotify for almost 2 years and now they do this to me im ditching this.

  • Umar

    GrooveShark is good.. ok its not as pretty as spotify but it does the job. Tbh i knew this was coming from Spotify it was a matter of enjoying the free time while it lasted. Its an old ploy really, attract everyone to a free product.. get them using it on a regularly basis and then BAM! restrict and charge. Luckily we have alternatives.

  • Jess

    "non-subscribers will only be able to listen to an individual track a maximum of five times overall"
    from http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/1679dc84-66b2-11e0-8d88

  • Tim McGee

    I bought a 32GB card for my Android Evo 4G almost a year ago. I can get a boatload of music on 32 GB. There are so many ways to listen to music on the Android platform who cares?

  • Sludos

    How much does an album cost in the shops? £7 perhaps? So a subscription of £9.99 a month for all the music your ears can take hardly seems unreasonable. Start paying for your music – and paying the artists the money they deserve you free-loaders!

  • dfthdfgh

    OR!!!!! You could pay for unlimited (which you niftily seemed to ignore…) which is £5 a month. For 10 million tracks. Hardly a bad deal?!?!

  • Aerris7

    The difference is that if I bought an album from a shop, I would own it. If I pay for one months subscription, yes I would get access to a lot of music, but it wouldn't be mine to keep and listen to whenever I want to, forever. Would you pay for commercial radio? There isn't much difference, only that free/open Spotify lets you choose what is played. But then radio doesn't have as many limitations on what you can listen to, Spotify doesn't have access to every new single/album and a lot of albums will be available one day and then gone the next.
    If you think the money is going directly to the artist then you're rather naive, it's more likely to be lining the pockets of record companies.
    I understand completely that music shouldn't be free, I just find the ploy of providing free music while claiming that they aim "to give you the power to listen to, discover, share and manage your music the way you want to" and then to turn around and change the rules after so long, was a dirty one. A good business ploy though, and good luck to them. I hope this fixes any problems they were clearly having and helps them branch out into other countries or whatever their big plan was.
    I'll maybe start with the unlimited if I can afford it, I know a lot of people probably think that £5 a month is nothing but to some of us who have more important things to spend money on each month, free/open Spotify was a breath of fresh air. A great shame, but nothing in this world is free!