New MacBook Pro, thermal paste issues in 2011 build

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The new 2011 range of MacBook Pro’s has only just been launched, but a teardown expert has raised concerns over the build quality on a notebook which will cost you $1,800.

An article on Computer World by Gregg Keizer is reporting that website iFixit.com, found several signs of substandard build quality as it took apart a 15-inch MacBook Pro. Among the findings of quality issues was a stripped screw close to the notebooks subwoofer enclosure, and an unlocked ZIF socket for the infrared sensor.

In the description on the site it said these sorts of things should not be “found inside a completely unmolested computer with a $1,800 base price.” There was also a large amount of thermal paste applied to the central and graphics processors. iFixit said that time will tell if this amount of paste will cause problems with overheating.

Thermal paste is used by computer makers to increase the thermal conductivity of a processor; this allows heat to be drawn away from the chip. But according to Jon Peddie, president of Jon Peddie Research a company which specializes in processors and graphics devices, says too much paste don’t always mean the processor will overheat.

But Peddie did say that too much paste shows “sloppy application, shoddy assembly work.” iFixit has said they will keep an eye on future Apple devices it strips down to see if this is a start of a trend.

Luke Westaway from Cnet UK has reviewed the 13-inch version of the MacBook Pro and liked its fast processors and stunning display. What wasn’t liked was the lack of an USB 3.0 port, no dedicated graphics card, and the expensive price. Use the link to read the full review.

Are you worried that Apple’s standards could be slipping?

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