RockMelt Browser: An In Depth Look At Social Network Browsing

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If you are one of those people who are constantly on Facebook at the same time as browsing the internet for more, lets say, real world activities such as online shopping, we may have a solution that for you that combines the two.

RockMelt is an entirely new browser that is built on the Facebook front end along with Google’s open source Chrome (or Chromium) web browser.

The browser is said to be as quick as Chrome but it does require you to log in to Facebook first so that it can validate all your data and integrate it into the browser. For the time being, RockMelt is invitation only, so good luck with getting a invite.

On first glance, the browser acts like any other browser –more specifically like Chrome. It has separate search and address fields, but it also harbours extra toolbars on either side of the browser. On the left hand side, you will see your Facebook friends icons and on the right you will be presented with your Twitter and RSS feeds.

The little icons let you interact with these specific friends, and shows you “what is on their mind,” as well as the ability to IM, chat and so on and so forth.

But being still in beta form, the Twitter side of things are not functional as of yet, plus there is one more social networking browser out there called Flock that you could try instead.

Being quite the social networking enthusiast I am, this is definitely worth having a look at, although I think the vast majority of you will just prefer sticking to switching tabs rather than having Facebook and Twitter permanently in your face at all times.

If you are interested in taking a look at RockMelt, check out their website here. You can look at an article where we stated our reasons for downloading the software, or you can also take part in a poll where we asked “Will you download RockMelt?

What are your views on social networking browsers? Have you tried Flock or RockMelt yet?

Source: Computer World

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