IE9: Better Than Chrome and Firefox in HTML5 Tests

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As you are probably aware many experts believe that HTML5 will replace Adobe Flash in the future, therefore web browsers are keen to support as many HTML5 features as possible.

Recently W3C ran tests across 5 popular web browsers to see which had the best support, in the tests they used Microsoft Internet Explorer Platform Preview 6, Google Chrome 7.0.517.41 beta, Mozilla Firefox 4 Beta 6, Opera 11.00 alpha (build 1029) and Safari Version 5.0.2 (6533.18.5).

Also See: Flash for iPad 3 / iPhone 5, doubts & mixed opinions

Microsoft’s browser delivered the best results, you can see an image embedded at the end of this post which compares Internet Explorer’s results against with Chrome’s and Firefox’s.

If you would like to see a fully detailed breakdown of the results check out this link, here you can see the results for all of the individual features tests with all of the web browser builds, I was quite shocked to see that Safari was so far behind considering Apple’s fondness of HTML5.

Safari was the only browser tested which wasn’t either a preview version or in its alpha or beta stages, it is strange that Apple has not worked harder with their browser to support all of the HTML5 features, perhaps they will release a new version with better HTML5 support soon.

Source: WC3

  • Joe

    "experts believe that HTML5 will replace Adobe Flash in the future"

    HTML5 and Flash are completely different things. HTML5 is a markup standard and Flash is a multimedia platform, delivered via a third-party plugin. The video and audio potential of HTML5 (of which there are many isues with regards to codec licensing) could replace the use of Flash-as-video and elements such as the canvas element could replace a few other applications of Flash. However HTML5 will not replace Flash per se as it is not an equivalent alternative.

    Also, am I right in thinking that the video support for Firefox is only lower becasue of its open-source nature? Firefox can't afford the H.264 codec license, and only supports open-source/free codecs.

    Cheers,

    Joe