Super Wi-Fi: How Fast Will the Speed be?

By Alan Ng - Sep 14, 2010

For those of you who desire the fastest broadband connection around, we have an interesting article for you to read now, which suggests that the availability of ‘super Wi-Fi’ may come sooner than a lot of people imagined.

As reported from Gather, it has been confirmed that the Federal Communications Commission will place a vote later on this month, on whether or not ‘white spaces’ will be allowed to be used for super fast broadband connections.

If you are not familiar with white spaces, they are the frequencies which are located in between TV channels, and if the FCC’s vote is successful, it will mean that regulators can attract businesses to use the space for new innovative consumer products.

Just how fast will this ‘super Wi-Fi’ be though, is it really worth going to all this trouble for it? Fiber Optic is still pretty remote where I live, so the thought of a brand new internet connection is a bit perplexing. What would you do with say a 100MB connection?

Full story through the link.

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Also See: O2 ensures priceless Wi-Fi during London 2012 Olympics

  • FreeWaikiki.com

    Just remember that different from a television, you need to be able to receive the signal, but more importantly you need hardware that can send a signal back, just as far with the same powerful signal, or it won't work at all. Think of it more like a police command center where the building has all the resources and tall antennas and powerful output signals for them to communicate with a police officer who is miles away. The police officer will easily be able to hear the base, but they need the same power to talk and send a signal back to the base. And that is going to require a whole new line of harware devices and an increase in power from your sending device. Again, the most powerful system is as fast as the weakest link. So if you are having troubles transmitting, then there is no hope in a quality connection.
    So please realize exactly what this new technology is capable of, and what it is designed to do. A simple ethernet cable can replace all of this.

    • jim

      I agree with everything except your last statement. A simple ethernet cable will only carry the single a few hundred feet without expensive equipment. I also doubt that Starbucks etc. would move from the current 802.11 equipment since the gain for them is in having the customer come into the coffee shop to use the free wifi, and buy something while they are there. They would probably lose customers if people could pick up free wifi from miles around.For all of the money our govt wastes on other things I think providing free nationwide broadband wifi would be a better stimulus package than anything to date. With that in place those who don't currently use internet because of the monthly costs would have a great reason to take the leap. That would spur PC sales. It would also bring in a era of free or near free phone service via cell phones that connect to the free wifi. Huge monthly savings for all, and a huge $ amount in all of our pockets which could be spent on other things spurring the economy further. The list goes on.

  • FreeWaikiki.com

    So a faster internet would allow me to watch on-demand multimedia in the resoultion that it was inteded to be seen at, and at a much faster pace with much shorter buffering, if any, would be very nice.
    The author opens this article by saying "For those of you who desire the fastest broadband connection around". But this is nothing to do with your broadband speed, as I see it. Imagine this. Connect your devices with an ethernet cable so that everything is a wired network. That is as fast as it gets. So there is nothing faster about it. But I am very interested in the range of the signal. It sounds like a "Super WiFi" connection would allow me to connect wirelessly to a hub that is much further away, piercing through walls and terrain. Now that is exciting! Many places offer free WiFi connections such as coffee shops usually do. Since I live within a half mile of a number of these coffee shops (in the center of Waikiki, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA), I should be able to connect to any number of these places and get free internet access. Now that is also very exciting to me.

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  • FreeWaikiki.com

    And once they discover things like popular internet sites (the big "H" is a favorite (precursor to "hoop") of mine) where you can watch a television show at high-def resolution which can give you a much sharper image on your computer screen than you could ever dream of on a television screen. Or watch any number of their hundreds or possibly a thousand movies, on demand, completely free of any charges, only paying by watching the short commercials that they place in the show, just like current television. Sometimes you even get the chance to watch a long commercial of say a couple of minutes first prior to the start of your show, and then you get to watch the whole show in its entirety without any commercial interuption. That is my preference.

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  • FreeWaikiki.com

    So what would I do with a 800 Mb/s connection? Everything I possibly could. Once you go up in speed, you realize just how awesome it is and wonder how you ever lived without it. It is just like your friend who is using dial-up internet and you have a broadband connection to the internet. They say that they are not interested in the speed and that they have no desire for it and that it won't benefit them at all. You try to convince them that once they get a taste of the very fast speed that they will discover a vast array of things that they can now do. Eventually your friend gets a taste of broadband somewhere.

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  • FreeWaikiki.com

    What is better though would be the speed of your own intranet system. Therefore the connection within the compound of your own home network will be much faster, and that is good.

    The author also asks you "What would you do with say a 100MB connection?" and realize that a 100 MB connection is 8 times faster than a 100 Mb connection (which is how every connection is measured in, megabits per second and very rarely megabytes per second, extremely different speeds). So just to be clear, a 100 MB (MegaBytes per second) is equal to 800 Mb (Megabits per second).

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