Students Laptop-itis: How to minimize risk

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The idea that students have been suffering from a condition called laptop-itis’ is something that I can sympathize with, as I know that I do not sit correctly – something that my chiropractor has moaned at me about on a regular basis for. Heavy users of laptops tend to suffer from headaches, neck and back pain, muscle strain and other such injuries.

Alan Mozes has written an article on USA Today that looks at some of the results from some research from the University of North Carolina. They point out that the main issue is how users are unable to arrange the keyboard and monitor (like the new New Apple 27-inch Cinema Display) on a laptop as they would on a desktop PC to get the perfect position.

Physician Dr. Kevin Carneiro said “When you use a laptop, you have to make some sort of sacrifice,” and he certainly has a point. I do not know how many times I have changed my seat or its position, as well as laptop stands just to try and get that perfect balance – something that I still look for now.

However, the research shows that there are certain steps that students and other long-term laptop users can take. The first tip is to make certain that your body forms 90-degree angles on your elbows, hips and knees. If you can, always try and connect your laptop to a monitor and add a keyboard (such as the Logitech K800) as well.

The most important thing is to make sure that you are in a position where you do not bend your neck – this will be the one thing that will help reduce the risk of headaches.

For a complete guide on how to reduce the risk of laptop-itis’ visit USA Today.

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