Google & Verizon Net Neutrality Proposal: Your Views?

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Yesterday, Google and Verizon Communications released a proposal that was aimed at the U.S. Federal Communications Commission suggesting that there should be a network neutrality enforcement, and broadband providers should be fined up to $2 million for violations.

The argument comes after days of rumored news reports that the two companies had reached an agreement to open the internet to all data, instead of broadband providers picking and choosing what traffic they allow through their systems.

In a dumbed-down explaination, it would mean that Google and Verizon would have their own ‘internet’ gateway, different from the current ‘public internet’ system, with their own “differentiated online” services.

Since the news broke that the two companies had agreed certain terms, and forwarded it on to net neutrality advocates, with critics claiming that it would do more harm than good citing the proposal is “worse than feared” if the plan was put into action. Even going as far as saying users would have to pay for premium content such as critical health care services and online gaming platforms.

While petitions and such are available to try and enforce the new open internet, others are questioning Google’s and Verizon’s motives for bringing up such a subject. Some even saying that Google are evil.

The petition from Adam Green, co-founder of the Progressive Change Campaign Committee titled “Don’t be evil – stand up for the free and open internet” has had more than 300,000 signatures, and contains an open letter that states:-

Dear Google,

As a Google user, I am telling you, ‘Don’t be evil.’ The deal between Google and Verizon is evil, because it threatens the open Internet, which hundreds of millions of people rely on every day. Live up to your founding motto, walk away from this deal and save the Internet.

Sincerely,

[Add your name]

What is your stance on Google and Verizon’s proposal? Are they right, or are they “evil?”

More information on the matter can be found via the source below.

Source: PC World

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