Apple Conference 2010: Strategy and delivering the goods

By Jamie Pert - Jun 7, 2010

Since Apple released the first-generation iPod and iPhone they have seen their share prices rocket, this has opened peoples eyes to “the Apple way”, which has resulted in Apple Mac desktops and Macbooks becoming a serious competitor Windows-based computers.

A huge part of their success is down to their closed system strategy, this directly apposes the open system which platforms such as Google Android have chosen to back.

There are pros and cons associated with both systems, however Apple’s closed system ensures that they have control over software which runs on devices such as the iPhone, this means that they get to quality check all software, to make it is up to their standard.

If they didn’t have their application approval system there is no doubt that the iPhone’s performance,security and reliability would suffer, an application could perhaps drain battery life, open up a security hole or cause the handset to freeze.

Whilst the iPhone users with greater technical knowledge will know that it is infact a third-party application fault causing problems, less knowledgeable iPhone owners will simply blame the iPhone.

This is one reason why Apple have chosen to snub Adobe Flash, they believe that Flash is poorly written, insecure and a drain on battery life, therefore they have decided to back HTML5 instead. Over the last year or so there have been quite a few Flash-related bugs/exploits etc, so I can understand Apple’s reasoning.

The only question is whether Apple’s governed closed system could perhaps be it’s downfall in the long-run, at the moment this doesn’t seem to be the case, however open systems allow developers around the world to fully unlock the potential of devices.

Do you think the iPhone would be a better handset if it was completely open?

Source: FinancialPost

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